Upper Key Stage 2 Year 5

Topic – Isolation in Space

As mentioned in my morning welcome today has quite an exciting event being hosted co-jointly by the ESA and Asteroid Day. The event explores what it is like to live in space in isolation. This may hit home with some of us who have spent a number of days in the same four outer walls of our homes. The link to join this event is as follows: https://asteroidday.org/spaceconnectsus/

Remember that the event is quite late (7pm-8pm) so be sure to check with your parents/guardians if it is ok to watch. They may like to join you.

 

As the ESA are exploring how to stay sane and cope in isolation, I’d like you to look into how astronauts live this way yourself. Back in October, when we spent the week looking at Mars, we touched on what Chris Hadfield showed us about living on the ISS. Build on this to find out what it is like to live in space and complete basic tasks. Maybe have a go at doing some of them back on earth (like how to wash your hair). I’ve given you some links to get you started.

 

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/an-astronaut-s-tips-for-living-in-space-or-anywhere

https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Human_and_Robotic_Exploration/Astronauts/Living_in_space

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIjNfZbUYu8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uL5sqe5Uk8

 

Also YouTube various videos from Chris Hadfield from when he was on the ISS. Also don’t forget our very own astronaut, Tim Peake. There are lots of fun bits on Youtube from him.

  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRuBvf-Qrno

Reading – Cosmic

 

It is with great pleasure that I am able to announce that we are able to continue to read Cosmic, penned by Frank Cottrell-Boyce. I know that many of you have really gotten into the story of Liam and Florida and how they managed to win the prize of a life time to ride the Rocket in China. How a twelve-year-old dad joins a team of four other children on a mission to space and how on earth they are going to escape their impending doom… maybe they won’t escape…

 

Last Friday, it occurred to me that as schools were closing to almost all students we wouldn’t be able to finish reading the book. I know copyright law (we touched on this in computing before half term) means that I can’t just record myself reading somebody else’s work without their permission and post it on the internet. It’s illegal; I’d end up in trouble as would the school. So how on earth is it that I’ve come to record myself reading it out loud and posted it online.

 

Well… last Friday, I sent an email to publishers of the novel –Pan Macmillian – to ask for their permission to do exactly that in light of the current Covid-19 pandemic induced school closure. This week (they were very rapid with their response) I received permission to do just as I am doing. So With the blessing of Publisher and author I present to you the next chapter of Cosmic ‘The Vomit Comet’.

 

Cosmic

Author: Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Published by: Pan Macmillian Children’s Books

@MacmillanKidsUK

Topic – Gravity

 

Sir Isaac Newton is known as the man who developed theories on Gravity and how we all stay planted to the Earth’s crust. In today’s chapter of Cosmic, Florida doesn’t understand what gravity is and the others struggle to fully explain it to her in a way that she can understand. We hadn’t yet learnt anything about gravity in school so this one is new for you at home.

 

I’m going to give you some links and I’d like you to try and explore the ideas of gravity and what it is. I’d like you to focus on the man who discovered it: Sir Isaac Newton. He is a British national treasure whose name will forever be a significant one in the history books but why? Why were his findings significant? How do we as a nation and as a planet remember him and what impact did his findings have at the time and what impact do they continue to have on our exploration and understanding of the globe, our Solar System and the greater depths of space?

 

This is a big topic, so it’s a good one for if you get bored over the weekend and want to explore a little deeper or further. I’ve attached a few links below which may help you but you’ll also need to search for some of your own research resources or even use books that you have at hand. It’d be great if you could get to the library right now, but I’m afraid that’s out for the time being. Shame.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/discovering-the-work-of-sir-isaac-newton/zr4mf4j

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/isaac-newton-the-man-who-discovered-gravity/zh8792p

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/science-ks2-the-work-of-sir-isaac-newton/zkw3qp3

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf66fg8

https://www.ducksters.com/biography/scientists/isaac_newton.php

https://www.theschoolrun.com/homework-help/sir-isaac-newton

Reading – Cosmic

 

Here is the next instalment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapters ‘Astrogossip’ and ‘Gravity is not a Trivial Monster’.

 

I filmed today’s and tomorrow’s chapters whilst my own monster one and two were in the house with me. As such, there are a few start and stops to the recording. Sorry about that.

 

Cosmic

Author: Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Published by: Pan Macmillian Children’s Books

@MacmillanKidsUK

Topic – Gravity & Centrifuges.

 

Last Friday I set you some work to look at Sir Isaac Newton and his discovery of gravity. If you didn’t get around to researching much on him, then continue with that today. You’ll find the task and links still posted from Friday.

 

In today’s instalment of Cosmic, the group were taken to a centrifuge. This is something that made them spin at unprecedented speeds to experience differing levels of g or gravity.

 

Use an online dictionary to define and find out about what a centrifuge is. There isn’t any reason to go overly technical on this one, mind.

 

Then I's like you to try and build your own centrifuge in your garden. It could be done inside, but you might need some towels handy. Get a bucket and a strong piece of rope. Half fill the bucket up with water. Then stand in the middle of some open ground and spin the bucket of water around you. You might get some spillages at the start and towards the end. If my instructions aren’t good enough; here is a link to help explain what I mean.

 

https://learning-center.homesciencetools.com/article/centripetal-force/

 

There are other ways that you can make your own centrifuge at home. Research them and see if you can give them a go.

Reading – Cosmic

 

Here is the next installment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapter ‘Last Chance to Vote’.

 

I filmed today’s chapter yesterday whilst my own monsters one and two were in the house with me. As such, there are a few start and stops to the recording and you may hear some singing in the background. Sorry about that.

 

Cosmic

Author: Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Published by: Pan Macmillian Children’s Books

@MacmillanKidsUK

Reading – Cosmic

 

Here is the next installment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapters ‘I’m half a world away’ and ‘If anything goes wrong’.

 

This is the last installment filmed at the weekend. Can you spot where I perform a magic trick and change places in the blink of an eye while also magically silencing my monster one?

 

There is a problem with the sound for the first 30 seconds or so. Watch the red line and when it disappears the sound will be back to normal. 

 

Cosmic

Author: Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Published by: Pan Macmillian Children’s Books

@MacmillanKidsUK

 

Topic

 

So far we know that in the story, Cosmic, none of the children are really qualified to become astronauts. We have read or listened to how the children are ‘trained’ in the story: by walking in the Gobi Desert, experiencing a zero-gravity flight and by experiencing high intensity gravity in the centrifuge.

 

What qualifications do you really need to be an astronaut?

What training do real astronauts have to go through?

 

Look into finding the answers out to these questions and then ask yourself whether you think you might have the skills to take on space. Is this something you’d like to do? Why/why not?

 

What are the risks that you might come across if you were to go into space? Are these risks worth it? What would you gain? What do you think it would feel like to be the first to get to somewhere?

 

The BBC conducted a competition into who could be selected as the next British astronaut to be put forward to ESA if a space were to become available. This first aired a few years ago, but will be airing again from this Saturday. Here is the link, and it’s quite informative.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b092ng4q

Reading – Cosmic

Here is the next instalment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapters ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ and ‘Doing the Dadly Thing’.

 

Cosmic

Author: Frank Cottrell-Boyce

Published by: Pan Macmillian Children’s Books

@MacmillanKidsUK

Here is the next instalment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapters ‘Logic Says…’ and ‘This is not a simulation’.

Here is the last instalment of Cosmic written by Frank Cottrell-Boyce and published by Pan Macmillian Children’s Books. Chapters ‘We got a bit lost’ and ‘Special Gravity’.

THE END - of Cosmic, that is.